Things I’ve heard: Anything true?


Antarctica Forums Forums Antarctic Memories Message Board Discussion topics Things I’ve heard: Anything true?

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #693
    fyancey
    Member

    It’s a no-no to go to see any medical personnel on base. You’ll loose your job.
    You need to find one of the underground medics if your hurt.

    If you get fired you have to pay your way back to the states which can be like 30 grand.

    You never get to leave base.. Is there some way around this?

    If you get within 3 ft of a penguin you’re gonna be fined millions of dollars

    What’s the story with this stuff? Any of it true?

    #7493
    m0loch
    Keymaster

    @fyancey wrote:

    It’s a no-no to go to see any medical personnel on base. You’ll loose your job.
    You need to find one of the underground medics if your hurt.

    absolutely untrue. You won’t get fired for getting hurt or for seeing medical

    If you get fired you have to pay your way back to the states which can be like 30 grand.

    Can you imagine the government of New Zealand’s reaction to this type of policy? They’d never let the USAP move its people through NZ. If you get fired (or quit) you get flown back to L.A. – from there, you’re on your own.

    You never get to leave base.. Is there some way around this?

    Lots of people get to leave station. Recreation is allowed off station (but within established boundaries) and there is work to be done in the field so people leave station for that too.

    If you get within 3 ft of a penguin you’re gonna be fined millions of dollars

    the fine is more like a potential of $25K and the distance is defined more as “if the animal reacts to your presence you’re too close” Most people just use common sense on this one and do fine.

    #7494
    MightyAtlas
    Moderator

    It’s also true that smoking, drinking, and sex are forbidden, and strictly enforced.

    #7495
    tehashi
    Member

    Nooooooo!!!!!

    Oh…wait…i don’t smoke, barely drink and am drasticly overestimating any ability i have to hook up with a female…guess it isn’t too bad then if that were true. :-j

    #7496
    thepooles98
    Keymaster

    I think the penguin fine is 10,000 dollars. Nobody in the last 10 years has been foolish enough to do something bad enough to get fined. Mostly you stand still or lay on your belly and let the penguins come to you.

    The firing issue for a while was a trip back to LA only and you had to fund the rest yourself. I think that has been changed back to you airport of departure. I have heard that the program with the blessing of NZ immigration walks you from your hotel to the first flight home without a chance to play in NZ. Some have fought it and survived to play in NZ.

    #7497
    spidey
    Participant

    Smart thing might be just to try and not get fired. Of course sometimes that may be out of your control. The whole CYA thing and when it doesn’t work out.
    What is the usual value of your flightback trade in?How far can you stretch it?

    #7498
    thepooles98
    Keymaster

    The others will have to answer. Now that my wife doesn’t go down. I pretty much stay a week or two in NZ and then take the fully paid direct flight back.

    #7499
    12tripssouth
    Member

    Uh… depending on the situation, you _may_ have to pay for your way home.

    Doc I worked with at Pole had a heart attack. A nurse, who was in charge of garbage handling kept him alive and never left his bedside for 4 days. It was touch and go.

    He had to be taken out at great expense due to the isolation of the station and because it was after season and in the dark. Canadian Twin Otters did the rescue.

    New doc was flown in in Twin Otter. The fuel cell was so big, there was only room for the two pilots, the doc, and that was about it. We had to outfit her with ECW gear once she arrived.

    Old doc had to pay for extrication to the tune of about $100k. Fortunately his insurance covered it. RPSC PR flacks caught him as touched down on US soil and they handled from there. On TV, he said he saved himself.

    Uh huh, yeah, right.

    #7500
    Been There
    Member

    Actually the Doc would have NEVER had to pay for the flight. Either the insurance that RPSC has would pay, and in this case it did, or NSF would have covered the costs as a contract cost. And the insurance is something that is covered under the contract as an allowable cost so NSF pays for that too.

    I have been directly involved in a number of these events in the past and the individual NEVER has to pay the cost. I have no idea were that idea came from. Let’s try real hard not to pass on mis-information. I know with the number of rumors that surface that is difficult but try! 😀

    BT

    #7502
    thepooles98
    Keymaster

    If the medical is an accident, all costs are covered by workmens comp. If a medical non accident like heart attack, the program pays to get you out, but you will have considerable costs associated with the hospital stays when you get home. These would be paid by the patient’s insurance if they have any. Anything not covered is the patients responsibility. Same with deductables.

    I think the only thing the program covers is the medical evacuation costs. Am I right BT?

    #7503
    DedEye
    Member

    @m0loch wrote:

    If you get within 3 ft of a penguin you’re gonna be fined millions of dollars

    the fine is more like a potential of $25K and the distance is defined more as “if the animal reacts to your presence you’re too close” Most people just use common sense on this one and do fine.

    Then how am I supposed to pet them ;)?

    #7504
    fyancey
    Member

    Ok. So as I’m reading it… people aren’t getting some form of medical insurance when they go on the ice? I thought that was a law of some sort…
    Isn’t it there to cover you in case some unforseen medical event happens?

    #7505
    Sciencetech
    Keymaster

    You are offered a variety of health care insurance plans, none of which you can actually use while you are on the ice. Why? Because there are no HMOs, PPOs, or other providers. Only the station clinic, which is free.

    Therefore you will never use your medical insurance until you are off the Ice (and contractually unemployed). There may be some circumstances where you go back to civilization for a week or two to have some procedure done and then return to the Ice, maintaining your employment, but that would be highly unusual.

    So why take the insurance? For COBRA. When you leave the Ice — especially if you are medevac’d — you may need medical insurance. You can’t sign up for COBRA unless you had health insurance while employed; if you opted-out of the company health care insurance and have to leave the Ice for a medical problem or accident, you’re hosed (unless you have some other insurance on your own).

    At orientation, when you are choosing health care insurance, remember that it is useful only after you leave employment. They should give you a sheet with COBRA rates for the various plans during orientation.

    #7506
    MightyAtlas
    Moderator

    Not that Glenn will ever need it, but the health insurance is also necessary for families back home – dependents – wife, kids, real world things.

    #7501
    Sciencetech
    Keymaster

    Atlas gets kind of mean when he forgets to take his medication.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.