need to purchase additional ECW gear?


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  • #598
    will
    Keymaster

    Hi Folks,

    I was looking over the flyer about the changes to ECW gear issue for this year and I was wondering what, if any of those items I need to go out and buy. Obviously the sun glasses and water bottle are a given. I am more curious about the lightweight underwear and wool socks. The bulk (if not all) of my job will be indoors. With this in mind will I need to purchase more of these items? Do people tend to wear long underwear everyday? I don’t want to go out and buy gear that I don’t need but at the same time I don’t want to get down there and regret not having enough of a particular item.

    Suggestions? Thoughts?

    On the clothing topic, are there any specialty clothing items that I should consider buying beforehand that will make my time down there more comfortable?

    Thanks!!!
    Mike

    #5849

    Hello,
     
    As always- the underwear thing is personal choice.  I would think ONE pair of lightweight undies would be smart – simply because you may have to walk from one building to another at some point!  (Sorry I didn’t pay attention to WHAT your job will be) But some buildings were snug and warm – others not.  2 pair of wool socks are fine that they give you. FOR BIG OL’ FAT MEN FEET.  I found it hard to stuff all that sock into my little shoes – so was glad to have brought sock liners and some lighter weight wool socks of my own.

    You don’t need a dozen of anything – just one pair / set / whatever.  I work a little outside and a little inside – so have to constantly put on and take off clothes.  I also found a fleece vest to be great. Kept me warmer – without binding up my arms in another layer.     Remember you will have at least ONE day off.  And you may want to hike or climb OB Hill – or walk to Scott Base. 

    There are no fashion bloops on the ice.   Darker colors last longer between washings!  I am taking mostly black and or brown items this year! The white tee shirts I took down last year became so nasty and grungy that I had to stick them in the rag box!
     
    I’m in Shuttles…. so let me know where ya want to go!
     
    Jo

    #5850
    MightyAtlas
    Moderator

    Don’t let Roxannie full you – she always went commando…

    #5851
    BoulderGeek
    Member

    I’m down at Pole right now. I brought a lot of extras (socks, 2-piece polypro longs, basically one of everything).

    I almost never wear the long underwear bottoms. I’m inside most of the time. When I need to go out, I use the fleece pants and Carhartts. When I’m inside, jeans are fine. The polypro longsleepe tops are nice for layering, though.

    Flip-flops that you can use to/from the shower and on days off are nice.

    I just wear jeans, boots and long sleeved t-shirts.

    #5852
    MightyAtlas
    Moderator

    Crap – I meant ‘fool’.
     
    Gotta be something Freudian in that…

    #5853
    MightyAtlas
    Moderator

    Hey, don’t listen to Boulder Geek – he’s a Polie, and they NEVER step outside.  They’d die if they did.
     
    People at McMurdo are much more hearty…

    #5854
    thepooles98
    Keymaster

    I’m on the other side of the coin and probably am more likely to wear warm clothing. I wore long underwear everyday on the ice and even in cold weather at home. I don’t like getting cold and I don’t like cold air on bare skin even if it’s 30 above. I like to carry my 70 degree room temperature with me everywhere. I’m a whoos I guess, but I am usually comfortable.
    Generally I wear a long sleeve tee  shirt or undershirt underneath a short sleeve shirt. It’s a little like wearing a vest and I can take off the short sleeve shirt if it gets too warm. .
    I wear loose fitting tight weave cargo pants with a pair thin polypro long underwear underneath in warmer weather. In colder weather I wear thin fleece pants or sweatpants as an inner layer. I never feel like the pants are too warm.
     
    It can get a little warm if you are in the wrong buildings, but if you go outside a lot, it makes a big difference on how fast you get cold.
     
    Socks as well. I have loose fitting shoes, so I can wear warm socks. If you are outside for any length of time, your feet can be the first thing to get cold.
    Mike

    #5855
    will
    Keymaster

    Hi All,

    I had a similar question, but from the other side of the coin: field camp, tent sleeping, mostly outdoors, etc.

    Does the CDC have a special collection of gear for a job like I’ll be doing (meteorological tech)? I’m assuming I’ll be getting filthy dirty at AGAP (aviation fuel and the like) and don’t want to bring (and possibly ruin) any good personal gear if I don’t have to. I haven’t gotten any specific information on the job yet other than the information in the job announcement from several months ago (and no contact information for any supervisors), so everything I’ve been doing to prepare for it has been based on the RPSC deployment handbook.

    I know that a few of you had previously posted some suggestions, but does anyone know of a comprehensive gear list (or do people generally wait to talk to the Camp Manager and CDC about this stuff)?

    Thanks!

    -=CH

    #5856
    will
    Keymaster

    Thanks for the suggestions everyone. If I haven’t said so before, this forum has been really helpful!!

    I do have a question about boots. I have a decent pair that I use for hiking that is perfect on rough terrain but is terrible with slick surfaces (wet concrete, ice etc). Obviously this might cause a problem. I was considering getting a pair of those slip on metal “cleets” that is supposed to add some traction. Anyone have any experience with those? Do they work?

    thanks,
    Mike

    #5857
    BoulderGeek
    Member

    Bah, CatTracks…here at Pole, ALL WE HAVE is ice. We do just fine, thank you very much. Or, so I’m told from those who actually do go outside. Nah, I go for a walk once a week or so.

    Polies are the hearty souls on this continent. Heh, I hear that MCM even has sunlight these days! Ppffffft! Cry me a river about how hard you island dwellers have it.

    it isn’t all champagne and eggs Benedict here, you know. Oh, wait, in the last three days it was….um, then there’s the cinnamon applesauce pancakes, ginger/dark chocolate flourless gateau, Thai night, fresh garlic naan to order with Indian food the other night, all of the theaters and HDTVs everywhere…yeah, OK, maybe Pole is a little soft. :-p

    Seriously, one of the good things I brought was a serious balaclava with better coverage than the CDC version. Nice to have (but again, I’m at Pole). Does MCM even get inclement weather? 😀

    #5858
    m0loch
    Keymaster

    CH

    no – CDC doesn’t have special gear for you BUT – on ice you’ll be issued some gear from the BFC – mostly sleeping related gear.

    from the CDC you should be issued carharrt insulated bibs which should be sufficient for dirty jobs – though most field camps have fuelie to deal with aviation fuel.

    #5859
    thepooles98
    Keymaster

    Boots are funny things. I once brought down a pair of really nice insulated Gortex boots. They were great at home, but once it got cold the soles hardened up and became death traps on ice. I couldn’t wear them. It seems to me that the softer soles work best, but wear out the fastest. Many departments are now providing work boots for their employees. Check before you buy your own.
    M
     

    #5860
    will
    Keymaster

    Thanks for the info. I figure I’ll be pointed in the right direction once I arrive. I have a feeling I’ll be spending much of my time in a big red parka. 🙂

    #5861
    Been_There
    Member

    CH,
     
    You need to be talking with the Camp Manager, Mike Tayloe, the guy you will be working for.  It’s great you are gathering information but he’s the one you need to be in communication with to get the straight skinny on what he expects.  All this other info is good and helpful but Mike is the key.  If he has not contacted you yet get the Science Support folks on the phone and tell them you need to be in contact with Mike directly.  It’s August and time will fly; before you know it you will be headed south! 
     
    BT

    #5862
    will
    Keymaster

    Hi BT,

    Yep, I know that things are moving rapidly ahead and that the remaining time is going to zip on by. I contacted RPSC about a week or so ago and was told that Mike is no longer going to be the camp manager for AGAP. Unfortunately, I am in a holding pattern now.

    -=CH

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