Antarctic Trivia


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Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 212 total)
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  • #9940
    Been There
    Member

    Hey does it count that I know Mike and Ray?

    BT

    #9941
    m0loch
    Keymaster

    It definitely counts…and it’s also why we can’t let you win.

    and Bill, yes, the mural is signed

    #9942
    Been There
    Member

    Have a look round Palmer for some of Mike other art work. Should be a weather vane on top of the sauna and a krill on the wood stove, orthats were it was last time I ws at Palmer.

    BT

    #9943
    skua77
    Keymaster

    BT, well I know Scott as well…
    Spidey, I really didn’t think that would be googleable, but with putting in the names, it came up.

    http://antarcticsun.usap.gov/pastIssues/2001-2002/2002_01_06.pdf That is actually an exellent art article…although there wasn’t a photo of the fuel tank art.

    #9944
    spidey
    Participant

    I think I got it with” mcmurdo mural tank” though obviously it is in palmer. It was on the the first page of results.
    The internet is a dangerous thing.

    #9945
    Mradyfist
    Member

    Name three countries with permanent stations in Antarctica which don’t have a territorial claim on the continent.

    I had an advantage on that one because I happened to know it was Palmer; when I first started considering this job I read an account from someone at Palmer and was focusing on that station.

    #9946
    Been There
    Member

    Russia, United States, Italy, India, China, five enough?

    BT

    #9947
    Mradyfist
    Member

    @Been There wrote:

    Russia, United States, Italy, India, China, five enough?

    BT

    Technically Italy’s permanent station is jointly owned between them and France, so that’s only 4.5 – still enough, though.

    #9948
    Been There
    Member

    Check again. Italy has two stations in Antarctica, one shared with France, Concodia, and the other at Terra Nova Bay, Zuchelli Station.

    OK let’s see…..how about the name of the base on Anvers Island before Palmer Station and the country that operated the station? And Old Palmer does not count.

    BT

    #9949
    Sciencetech
    Keymaster

    Base N, and it was the Brits.

    #9950
    Mradyfist
    Member

    @Been There wrote:

    Check again. Italy has two stations in Antarctica, one shared with France, Concodia, and the other at Terra Nova Bay, Zuchelli Station.
    BT

    I was thinking of permanent as being permanently staffed as opposed to just permanent, but I guess that doesn’t really help if I don’t mention that context in the question.

    #9951
    Been There
    Member

    Glenn,

    British Base N is correct. You are up. And for extra points, what does FID stand for?

    BT

    #9952
    spidey
    Participant

    FID could be looked at a few different ways.
    Its actually a tool used for splicing rope, but from that its evolved into a term for using the incorrect tool or making do with available options rather than doing it the way it was designed to be done. Similar to a more common but politically incorrect phrase describing a way of “rigging things.”
    It was also the name of an area adjacent to the Ross Dependency during the earlier part of the century which was central to the sovereignty claims being made by the Brits, Norweigans, Germans, the US, France, as well as Chile and Argentina in the 1940’s.

    #9953
    Been There
    Member

    Spidey,

    FID was the Falkland Island Dependencies or the Falkland Island Dependencies Survey. In 1962 is became the British Antarctic Survey or BAS. Not close to the New Zealand claimed territory, the Ross Dependency.

    FYI the United States has never had a territorial claim in Antarctica. Seven countries have territorial claims (New Zealand, United Kingdom, Australia, Chile, Argentina, France and Norway). The Antarctic Treaty skillfully deals with the issue by stating that nothing any country does during the period of the treaty adds to nor detracts from their right to make a territorial claim. The Treaty was signed by 12 nations in 1959, including the seven with claims, and came into force in 1961. Today 46 nations are members of the treaty, representing 2/3’s of the worlds population. And the Antarctic Treaty has no end date! Wonder document.

    End of lesson 😀

    BT

    #9954
    spidey
    Participant

    Danke for the correction.
    I was basing some of that off a passage in Peter Belk’s Book ” The International Politics of Antarctica”. He wrote that in 1939 Norway moved to advance a territorial claim to a sector adjacent to the FID in order to pre-empt any German claim to the area. he also went on to state that the area marked out for the US, which he described as the sector between the FID and the Ross Dependency, was not claimed by the Americans partly due to the impact of the war and inaccessibility and economic unattractiveness of the sector.
    From all of that it seemed I made it out to be an area next to the Ross dependency.
    It makes a lot more sense when someone who knows what they are talking about explains it to you.

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