Antarctic Trivia


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  • #10105
    Been There
    Member

    Like I said earlier, BT doesn’t care. I know I was in the program before Julies, Commander and Rob.

    BT

    #10106
    spidey
    Participant

    Found this fun list so thought I’d throw it up. A bunch of firsts. Can’t verify the accuracy of all of them.

    First time the word ‘penguin’ is used to describe the southern bird. (1586-1588). Occurred on the third circumnavigation of the world by Thomas Cavendish in the Desire.

    First drawing of an Antarctic tabular iceberg. (February 1700). Appeared in the logbook of Edmond Halley’s ship Paramore.

    First to cross the Antarctic Circle. (January 17, 1773). Captain James Cook on his second voyage in the Resolution and Discovery. Crossed a total of three times during that voyage. In doing so, Cook was the first to circumnavigate Antarctica.

    Possibly the first to die in Antarctica, the Spanish officers, soldiers and seamen on board the San Telmo which sank in September 1819. There is a cairn commemorating this at Half Moon Beach, Cape Shirreff, Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands.

    First to sight Antarctic continent. (January 27, 1820). Captain Thaddeus Bellingshausen in the Vostok and Mirnyy. Reached 69° 21’S, 2° 14’W saw an “icefield covered with small hillocks.”

    First to chart any of the Antarctic continent (Trinity Land). (January 30, 1820). Edward Bransfield and William Smith in the Williams.

    First known landing on Antarctic continent. (February 7, 1821). Capt. John Davis in the Cecilia lands at Hughes Bay, Antarctic Peninsula.

    First recorded Antarctic winter spent on land. (1821). Eleven men of the Lord Melville, a sealer, on King George Island, South Shetlands.

    First scientist to work in Antarctica. William H.B. Webster sailed aboard the Chanticleer to South Shetlands to make pendulum and magnetic observations. Entered Deception Island on January 9, 1829.

    First fossils found in Antarctica. (1830). Found by James Eights, Palmer-Pendleton expedition, South Shetlands.

    First sighting of the Antarctic continent in the Indian Ocean sector (Enderby Land). (February 24, 1831). John Biscoe, in the Tula and Lively.

    First to confirm that a great mass of land did exist in the Antarctic. (1830-1831). John Biscoe, in the Tula and Lively.

    First landing south of the Antarctic Circle. (February 9, 1839). Captain John Balleny in the Eliza Scott and the Sabrina. Discovered and landed on the Balleny Islands.

    First US expedition to include Antarctica. (1838-1842). United States Exploring Expedition under Lt. Charles Wilkes.

    First dog known to have been in the Antarctic. (1839). ‘Sydney,’ a dog picked up in Australia by Lt. Charles Wilkes of the United States Exploring Expedition.

    First ever to enter the Ross Sea. (January 9, 1841). Sir James Clark Ross in the ships Erebus and Terror.

    First ever fancy dress ball in Antarctica. (December 31, 1841). New Years Eve during Sir James Clark Ross’s expedition.

    First fish caught below the Antarctic Circle. (February 1842). Landed on the Terror during Ross’s expedition. The ship’s cat found it and made a meal of it.

    First landing on Greater Antarctica (Victoria Land). (January 26, 1853). Mercator Cooper in the Levant out of Sag Harbor, New York.

    First expedition to the Antarctic whose aims were solely scientific. (1872-1876). Challenger expedition, under Captain Sir George Nares and Wyville Thomson, sponsored by the Royal Society.

    First steamship to cross the Antarctic Circle. (February 16, 1874). Challenger expedition, under Captain Sir George Nares and Wyville Thomson, sponsored by the Royal Society.

    First photographs taken of Antarctic icebergs. (1874). Challenger expedition, under Captain Sir George Nares and Wyville Thomson, sponsored by the Royal Society.

    First steamship to reach the coast of Antarctica. (1873-1874). German whaling expedition under Captain Eduard Dallmann in the Grönland..

    First fossils found in the Antarctic. (1830). Found by James Eights, Palmer-Pendleton expedition.

    First vegetation (lichens) found below the Antarctic Circle. (January 18, 1895). Found by Carsten Borchgrevink on Possession Island during the Bull expedition in the Antarctic.

    First substantiated landing on Antarctic continent proper. (January 24, 1895). Carsten Borchgrevink and two others all claim to have been the first to step ashore, at Cape Adare during the Bull expedition in the Antarctic.

    First scientific vessel to visit the Antarctic continent itself. (1897-1899). Belgica (formerly Patria) under Adrien de Gerlache during the Belgian Antarctic Belgica expedition.

    First man to ski in Antarctica. (January 26, 1898). Roald Amundsen on Two Hummock Island during the Belgian Antarctic Belgica expedition. [May have occurred during Carl Anton Larsen expedition (1892-1893) in the Jason. Headland in his Chronology says it occured during the 1893-94 Norwegian expedition that included Carl Anton Larsen.]

    First to sledge in Antarctica. (January 31, 1898). De Gerlache, Amundsen, Cook, Arctowski and Danco on Brabant Island during the Belgian Antarctic Belgica expedition.

    First to spend a full winter so far south (below 60 degrees). (1897-1899). Belgian Antarctic Belgica expedition.

    First to use of Primus stoves in the Antarctic. (1898-1900). Southern Cross expedition under Carsten Borchgrevink.

    First time dogs were used on the Antarctic continent. (1898-1900). Southern Cross expedition under Carsten Borchgrevink.

    First deliberate wintering-over in Antarctica. (1899-1900). At Cape Adare during Southern Cross expedition under Carsten Borchgrevink.

    First Australian to winter-over in Antarctica: Louis Bernacchi (1899). Southern Cross expedition under Carsten Borchgrevink.

    First “cinematograph” (movies?) taken in Antarctica. (April 1899). Southern Cross expedition under Carsten Borchgrevink.

    First human earth burial in the Antarctic. (October 14, 1899). Nicolai Hansen buried above Cape Adare; grave was “dug” with dynamite. Southern Cross expedition under Carsten Borchgrevink.

    First sledge journey on Ross Ice Shelf. (February 16, 1900). Party sledged 10 miles to new ‘Furthest South’. Southern Cross expedition under Carsten Borchgrevink.

    First to winter over on the Peninsula. (1901-1904). At Snow Hill Island during Swedish South Polar expedition under Otto Nordenskjöld aboard the Antarctic.

    First real land expedition in the Antarctic. (1901-1904). British National Antarctic expedition under Robert F. Scott aboard the Discovery.

    First balloon ascent in Antarctica. (February 4, 1902). Eva was name of balloon. British National Antarctic (Discovery) expedition under Robert F. Scott.

    First Antarctic aerial photography. (February 4, 1902). Taken by Shackleton from the balloon Eva. British National Antarctic (Discovery) expedition under Robert F. Scott.

    First broken leg from skiing in the Antarctic. (February 17, 1902). Suffered by Chief Steward Reginald Ford. British National Antarctic expedition under Robert F. Scott in the Discovery.

    First crops (mustard and cress) grown in the Antarctic. (October 1902). British National Antarctic expedition under Robert F. Scott in the Discovery.

    First harvest of first crops grown in the Antarctic. (November 1, 1902). British National Antarctic expedition under Robert F. Scott in the Discovery.

    First man to walk on the polar plateau. (January 1903). Albert B. Armitage, leader of the Western Party. British National Antarctic expedition under Robert F. Scott in the Discovery.

    First surgical operation performed in Antarctica. (October 18, 1903). Dr.Koettlitz removes cyst from Lt. Royds’ cheek. British National Antarctic expedition under Robert F. Scott in the Discovery.

    First fossils found on Antarctic continent. (1903). Found by Hartley Ferrar. British National Antarctic expedition under Robert F. Scott in the Discovery.

    First moving pictures taken in the Antarctic. (1902-1904). Scottish National Antarctic expedition under William Speirs Bruce in the Scotia. Also attributed to Eric Marshall during Shackleton’s Nimrod expedition, 1907-09. [See above, April 1899.]

    First permanent scientific station to be established in the Antarctic, at Laurie Island, South Orkneys. (1902-1904). Scottish National Antarctic expedition under William Speirs Bruce in the Scotia.

    First bagpipe concert in Antarctica. (March 10, 1904). Gilbert Kerr, in kilt, plays to Emperor penguin. Scottish National Antarctic expedition under William Speirs Brice in the Scotia.

    First steel vessel to cross the Antarctic Circle, the Koonya with the Nimrod in tow (January 1908). British Antarctic expedition under Ernest H. Shackleton.

    First automobile in Antarctica lowered onto ice. (February 1, 1908). British Antarctic expedition under Ernest H. Shackleton in the Nimrod.

    First instance of printing from set type on the Antarctic continent. (Issued June 23, 1908). Menu for the Midwinter Celebration at Winter Quarters, Cape Royds. British Antarctic expedition under Ernest H. Shackleton in the Nimrod.

    First evidence of coal found in Antarctica, discovered by Frank Wild. (December 17, 1908). British Antarctic expedition under Ernest H. Shackleton in the Nimrod.

    First book–Aurora Australis–produced (writen, edited, illustrated, printed, bound and issued) in the Antarctic. (Issued July 1908). British Antarctic expedition under Ernest H. Shackleton in the Nimrod.

    First soldier to join a British polar expedition, Captain L. E. G. Oates. (1910-1913). British Antarctic expedition under Robert F. Scott in the Terra Nova.

    First professional photographer in the Antarctic, Herbert G. Ponting. (1910-1913). British Antarctic expedition under Robert F. Scott in the Terra Nova.

    First Antarctic land-line telephone installed, linking Cape Evans and Hut Point. (1910-1913). British Antarctic expedition under Robert F. Scott in the Terra Nova.

    First to reach South Pole. (December 14, 1911). Norwegian Antarctic expedition under Roald Amundsen in the Fram. Polar party: Amundsen, Bjaaland, Hassel, Hanssen and Wisting. Olav Bjaaland probably first to actually stand at the Pole.

    First expedition to have radio. (1911-1914). Australasian Antarctic expedition under Douglas Mawson in the Aurora.

    First expedition to take an airplane. (1911-1914). Australasian Antarctic expedition under Douglas Mawson. Plane never flew as it crashed before leaving; wings were removed and it was used as an “aero-tractor”.

    First radio contact between Antarctica and another continent. (September 25, 1912). Australasian Antarctic Expedition under Douglas Mawson. Initially radios could transmit but not receive; on 2/1913 two-way communication established.

    First Antarctic meteorite found, by Francis Bickerton, Leslie Whetter and A.J. Hodegman. (December 5, 1912). Australasian Antarctic expedition under Douglas Mawson.

    First ordained clergyman to set foot on the Antarctic continent (Cape Evans), Arnold P. Spencer-Smith. (January 17?, 1915). Ross Sea Party, Imperial Trans-Antarctic expedition in the Aurora.

    First Antarctic flight. (November 16, 1928). Wilkins-Hearst expedition under Hubert Wilkins. Flight in the Los Angeles by Wilkins and Eielson was 20 minutes at Deception Island.

    First flight over Antarctic continent. (December 20, 1928). Wilkins-Hearst expedition under Hubert Wilkins. Flew over Graham Land from Deception Island.

    First airplane to take off from or land on Antarctic continent, Stars and Stripes, a Fairchild folding wing monoplane. (January 15, 1929). Byrd Antarctic expedition under Richard E. Byrd. [See http://www.antarctic-circle.org/E55.htm%5D

    First flight over South Pole. (November 29, 1929). Byrd Antarctic expedition under Richard E. Byrd. Aircraft Floyd Bennett with Byrd, Balchen, June and McKinley.

    First winter circumnavigation of Anarctica. (1932). Discovery II, Stanley Kemp, Captain.

    First seismic observations in the Antarctic. (1933-1935). Second Byrd Antarctic expedition under Richard E. Byrd.

    First dairy cows in Antarctica. (1933-1935). Second Byrd Antarctic expedition under Richard E. Byrd. [See http://www.antarctic-circle.org/E07.htm%5D

    First man to winter over alone, Richard E. Byrd. (March 28 – August 10, 1934). Second Byrd Antarctic expedition under Richard E. Byrd.

    First human voice radio broadcast from Antarctic continent. (1933-1935). Second Byrd Antarctic expedition under Richard E. Byrd.

    First cosmic ray observations. (1933-1935). Second Byrd Antarctic expedition under Richard E. Byrd.

    First woman to set foot on the Antarctic mainland, Caroline Mikkelsen. (February 20, 1935).

    First flight across Antarctica. (Departing November 23, 1935). Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon in aircraft Polar Star from Dundee Island to near Little America II, 2300 miles in six stages over two weeks.

    First African-American in Antarctica, George W. Gibbs, Jr. (1940). Third Byrd Antarctic expedition under Richard E. Byrd.

    First use of of helicopters and icebreakers. (1946-1947). Fourth Byrd expedition (Operation Highjump).

    First Antarctic expedition to include women. (1947-1948). Ronne Antarctic Research expedition under Finn Ronne. Jennie Darlington and Edith (Jackie) Ronne wintered over.

    First truly international expedition to the Antarctic continent (1949-1952). Norwegian-British-Swedish Antarctic expediton.

    First Head of State to visit the Antarctic, Gabriel Gonzales Videla of Chile, in 1950.

    First airplane to land at South Pole. (October 31, 1956). Operation Deep Freeze II under Admiral John Dufek. Aircraft Que Sera Sera (an R4D) lands at South Pole, piloted by Conrad Shinn.

    First commercial flight to the Antarctic continent. (October 15, 1957). The two stewardesses–Ruth Kelley and Pat Heppinstall–became the first women ever to visit a U. S. Antarctic base.

    First successful land traverse of Antarctica. (November 24, 1957 – March 2, 1958). British Commonwealth Transantarctic expedition under Vivian Fuchs. Weddell Sea to Ross Sea via the Pole.

    First recorded birth of any species at the South Pole. (March 14, 1961). Pandora the hamster gave birth to twins at South Pole Station.

    First nocturnal flight and landing in Antarctica, US mission to take Leonid Kuperov from Byrd Station for medical treatment. (April 9, 1961).

    First helicopters to fly to the South Pole. (February 4, 1964). Three UH-1B turbo-powered Iroquois helos from Mount Weaver.

    First human birth on Antarctic continent, Emilio Marcos de Palma born at Esperanza Station. (January 7, 1978).

    First South Pole Marathon. (April 20, 1981). Run by Dr. Chuck Huss on a treadmill in Biomed.

    First women to reach the South Pole by land, Victoria E. Murden and Shirley Metz. (January 17, 1989).

    #10107
    spidey
    Participant

    So we need a new question. First person who has not posted a question before goes.

    #10108
    spidey
    Participant

    OK I’ll throw one up.
    Who was the first bald man in antarctica?

    #10109
    skua77
    Keymaster

    I have absolutely no idea, but am definitely curious. Certainly wasn’t any of us 1977 Polies…perhaps the most hirsute w/o team ever.

    http://www.southpolestation.com/trivia/history/19770.jpg

    #10110
    spidey
    Participant

    I believe the first barber was Anton on the first Scott expedition

    [attachment=0:pfcd4cxv]haircut.jpg[/attachment:pfcd4cxv]

    #10111
    spidey
    Participant

    So I saw that MSNBC/NBC will be running a bit tomorrow Satuday Jan 15th on Antarctica. Likely is coverage and interviews with the Erik Larsen team and I think it will be part of the Today show.
    So Just a heads up if anyone wants to see it, or finds this post later and wants to look for it on the MSNBC web page.
    Cheers! and happy Friday!

    #10112
    spidey
    Participant

    Perhaps more US trivia, but I see the LORAN navigation system will be shut down on Feb 8th in the US.
    Was it ever used around the ice? I seem to remember reading about navigation buoys but that may have been different technology.
    We’ll also have a good question to ask after a while when people wonder what was the board’s first 1000 post thread all about.

    #10113
    spidey
    Participant

    Don’t know if anyone was a big fan of the cable sci-fi series Lexx, but one of its stars, Eva Habermann just made a trip down to the ice.
    I think her father is actually involved with one of the German research projects there (won’t swear to it though).
    Anyway, they did a story on her trip with a small photo gallery for the online version of the German Magazine Bild.
    Here’s the link if you are interested….
    http://www.bild.de/BILD/unterhaltung/leute/2010/01/29/eva-habermann/urlaub-in-der-antarktis-schreibt-exklusiv-fuer-bild-de-leser.html

    #10114
    spidey
    Participant

    If you didn’t see Jim Logan’s post in the OAE section, he has put up about 200 slides from Siple station 1986 on Facebook.
    http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=2033800&id=1421877476
    Its some neat stuff. I love getting these glimpses into things.

    (Just note you will need to have a FB account to see them)

    #10115
    spidey
    Participant

    Thought I’d see if I could revive this thread, it was a lot of fun. After attending a lecture at AMNH last night on the Race to the End, it got me fired up again.

    So here is a potentially easy one. One of the major factors that contributed to Amundsen’s success was his use of sled dogs. How many did he start out with and how many did he return with?

    #10116
    Idan
    Member

    @spidey wrote:

    So here is a potentially easy one. One of the major factors that contributed to Amundsen’s success was his use of sled dogs. How many did he start out with and how many did he return with?

    I just saw this article about the animals used by Scott and Amundsen: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/28/science/28polar.html?_r=1&ref=science

    To answer your question, he started with 52 and came back with 11.

    #10117
    Kelly74Q
    Member

    Does anyone have the recipe for Norwegian Dog Adobo?

    #10118
    Sciencetech
    Keymaster

    Shoot. Stew.

    Just don’t eat the livers.

    [Okay, there’s the next related trivia question: Did Amundsen’s team eat the dogs or just feed them to the other dogs?]

    #10119
    spidey
    Participant

    I found this recipe on Google, though I can’t say I endorse it.

    3 kg dog meat — * see note
    1 1/2 cups vinegar
    60 peppercorns — crushed
    6 tablespoons salt
    12 cloves garlic — crushed
    1/2 cup cooking oil
    6 cups onion — sliced
    3 cups tomato sauce
    10 cups boiling water
    6 cups red pepper — cut into strips
    6 pieces bay leaf
    1 teaspoon tabasco sauce
    1 1/2 cups liver spread — ** see note
    1 whole fresh pineapple — cut 1/2 inch thick

    1. First, kill a medium sized dog, then burn off the fur over a hot fire.

    2. Carefully remove the skin while still warm and set aside for later (may be used in other recpies)

    3. Cut meat into 1″ cubes. Marinade meat in mixture of vinegar, peppercorn, salt and garlic for 2 hours.

    4. Fry meat in oil using a large wok over an open fire, then add onions and chopped pineapple and suate until tender.

    5. Pour in tomato sauce and boiling water, add green peper, bay leaf and tobasco.

    6. Cover and simmer over warm coals until meat is tender. Blend in liver spread and cook for additional 5-7 minutes.

    * you can substiture lamb for dog. The taste is similar, but not as pungent.

    ** smooth liver pate will do as well.

    – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

    Suggested Wine: San Miguel Beer
    Serving Ideas : Rice, naturally.

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