Videographer or Otherwise?


This topic contains 19 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  mjkoehler 9 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #775

    mjkoehler
    Member

    Greetings,

    I’m new to the forums!

    My name is Michael Koehler; I am a senior at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts majoring in Film and Television production. I have written and directed several media projects – including a documentary recently broadcast on network television and a short film photographed in the Czech Republic – and have an avid interest in Antarctica.

    I have chosen to take this upcoming semester off from school in order to pursue summer (October-February) employment with the Raytheon Polar Services Company and/or their associates. Although I am thrilled to work any position, I feel that my specific skill-set best outfits me as a videographer. Could the Antarctic Team use someone to document their work, for publicity purposes or otherwise? For the record, I would be more than happy to work in other capacities, as well. I have a resume available upon request.

    Furthermore, should a summer contract be impossible, I am open to taking a year off from school and signing on-board with a winter-over contract.

    I am fully aware that Antarctica is not a cake-walk, and that a contract is not a vacation. Having spent ten years in Uganda, East Africa, I understand difficult living conditions and welcome related challenges.

    Any insight you can provide is very, very much appreciated!

    Thank you for your time, and all the best!

    ~Mike

    #7826

    Sciencetech
    Keymaster

    Hi Mike,

    Welcome to the forums.

    McMurdo has a kind of local television station and a few FM radio stations. I don’t know the current staffing level, but in past years they’ve had up to two people running things during the summer months and one during the winter. One or the other contractual employee typically handles any official videography requests. The place to check for open positions is on the Rayjobs website, http://www.rayjobs.com/index.cfm?NavID=103. When looking for Antarctic positions, even though Antarctica is listed under the Preferred Location menu, be sure to also select “CO – Centennial” as that’s where most of the Antarctic jobs will be listed. Since there are not many positions in that job category and perhaps a higher retention rate than for other positions, the openings may be infrequent (so jump on it if you see one). Recently the company has also had a full-time video production person based in Colorado who takes footage on the Ice during the summer season.

    Around this time of the year (hiring season!) there is always an active discussion about getting jobs on a friend’s website: http://groups.msn.com/Antarcticmemories/leaveamessage.msnw. I suggest reading through the comments there to get a better idea of what you’re getting yourself into — most of the questions are asked by newbies trying to get jobs, wade through the aggravating hiring process, and wondering what to pack once they get hired. I post on that board as “sciencetech”.

    Good luck!

    glenn

    #7827

    Sciencetech
    Keymaster

    Hey Mike,

    I just checked Rayjobs and they have a “Broadcast Engineer” position open. That’s you! See if it’s something you’d like.


    Broadcast Engineer (2008-2009)

    Job ID: TSC110608
    Description:
    Broadcast Engineer (2008-2009)
    Raytheon Polar Services – Experience Antarctica!

    Seeking a unique adventure as well as employment? How would you like to be one of the few people on the planet to have the opportunity to live and work at or near the geographic South Pole? Raytheon Polar Services Company is the primary contractor through the National Science Foundation (NSF) for the United States Antarctic Program. We are currently seeking Broadcast Engineers to deploy to McMurdo Antarctic Research Station for various periods of time beginning in approximately August of 2008. If you are interested in further pursuing this opportunity please apply online today at http://www.rayjobs.com/rpsc!

    We are seeking both PRIMARY & ALTERNATE employees to fill all contract positions. The primary is first in line for the position and the alternate is next in line to deploy should the primary person be unable to meet position and/or deployment requirements.

    Responsibilities:

    The Broadcast Engineer is responsible for the following: troubleshooting, maintenance, scheduling and operation of AFRTS Radio & Television broadcast equipment; primary responsibility of operating master control; operates, repairs, and maintains the electronic broadcasting equipment for radio and television to include digital production equipment; schedules and performs periodic maintenance and repair; operates and troubleshoots video teleconferencing; monitors and maintains satellite signals to insures they are operational and broadcast quality; installs broadcast equipment; troubleshoots any radio or television reception problems; occasionally designs and modifies equipment to employer specifications; assists with television programming as needed; responsible for dubbing as requested as approved by supervisor; assists with live coverage of science lectures and other events to set up and operate; updates and maintains scroll as needed.; sets up broadcast systems for air or for production.; must be able to design and install television and radio systems and have the ability to repair at component level

    Qualifications:

    REQUIRED SKILLS: High school diploma or equivalent required. Successful candidate must have at least four years of relevant experience with a demonstrated ability to work independently in remote locations and environments. Broadcast Engineer is required to be proficient in Microsoft Office and have the ability to perform tasks while operating on both PC and Mac platforms. Must have experience in both analog and digital video equipment, as well as knowledge of electronic theory as it pertains to video and audio, an understanding of broadcast specifications, diagrams, and manuals, and have a clear understanding of copyright protection issues, and ability to comprehend DOD 5120.20. Must have experience in digital video production including cameras and editing and keep up to date on digital video technology. The individual must be knowledgeable of CATV, digital, and satellite broadcasting systems.

    DESIRED SKILLS: Associates Degree in Electronics, Computer Sciences, or Television Production preferred; FCC General Class Operator’s licenses helpful, but will accept the equivalent demonstrated ability or training

    #7828

    mjkoehler
    Member

    Fantastic.

    Thank you, Glenn! I’ll hop on this and be in touch.

    Take care,

    ~Mike

    #7829

    Been There
    Member

    Mike,

    You owe Glenn a beverage for sure. While the position posted does not include viedo work, it sure is the next best thing and that position would likely work closely with the person that would be doing any filming. As you will read in many of the other posts, once you get in the program other doors open.

    BT

    #7830

    mjkoehler
    Member

    Absolutely. Many thanks!

    ~Mike

    #7831

    Sun Dog
    Member

    Mike,

    I do not know a lot about this program, but it may be worth looking into and maybe it could work for you in the near future?

    http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=12783

    http://www.nsf.gov/od/opp/aawr.jsp

    S.D.

    #7832

    mjkoehler
    Member

    This looks fascinating – I’ll check into this, as well. Thank you, Sun Dog!

    #7833

    Been There
    Member

    Mike,

    Don’t want to paint a negative picture for you but two things you should know in advance. The Artist & Writers program is very competitive and selecting for the coming austral summer have likely already been made.

    BT

    #7834

    mjkoehler
    Member

    I appreciate the heads up – their website seems to indicate that final project proposals are being accepted until June 18, which suggests to me that applications are still being considered. I’m not banking on this, though. I am pursuing the Broadcast Engineer position. Should things not work out this season…Well, I feel that I have a much better understanding of what this all entails, and there’s always next year. I’ll keep pushing. Thanks!

    #7835

    mjkoehler
    Member

    Gah! It seems that someone beat me to the Broadcast Engineer position :p I’ve been tweaking my resume and reading up on the forums; I suppose I spent too long in prep before applying. A Human Resources Assistant position was posted two days ago. It’s not video-related, but it sounds like something I could certainly manage. I’ll check into it.

    #7836

    mjkoehler
    Member

    I apologize for the recent frequency of my postings, but a related question just occurred to me: would working in Raytheon’s Centennial Office assist me in getting a job on the Ice in the near future?

    #7837

    Sciencetech
    Keymaster

    No apology necessary, ask away!

    Many of the office positions are also deploying deploying positions. If you took a non-deploying position chances are good that, eventually, you would deploy (or else find a position that would allow you to). The drawback, of course, is that most of the office positions are full time, and it may take a year or two for the position change.

    Here’s a funny fact… Some of the ‘old timers’ working in the office don’t want to deploy. That means they often look for people willing to deploy instead of them. This may seem odd to a newbie, but after you’ve been going to the Ice for a bunch of years you start to look for ways to stay home.

    g

    #7838

    mjkoehler
    Member

    Hm – that is certainly interesting!…I’ve found a job opening in the Centennial Office that runs for sixteen weeks, and I was just curious as to whether or not it would be wise to apply, in light of my intention to hit the Ice in the near future.

    #7839

    Sciencetech
    Keymaster

    @mjkoehler wrote:

    … I was just curious as to whether or not it would be wise to apply, in light of my intention to hit the Ice in the near future.

    That I don’t know. If it’s down your line (videography) I’d say go for it, otherwise…

    Working TDY in the office for a while would probably help you get a foot in the door, but there’s no guarantees. Most of us are fairly outdoorsy, so working in the dismal cubical-land of the office is a purgatory to be avoided.

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